President Joe Biden apparently doesn't want to consult with Idaho's governor when it comes to fire management.  Although, the Gem State is one of the most impacted states from wildfires year in and year out.  Governor Little's Office disclosed the dust up in a release today. 

Governor Brad Little and Montana Governor Greg Gianforte were left out of a meeting President Joe Biden hosted today with just eight governors – mostly Democrats – regarding wildfire. Governor Little told us a few months ago that the White House did not return his calls during the Covid Crisis.

KEVIN MILLER/KIDO TALK RADIO

 

Despite facing severe wildfire seasons, Idaho and Montana are two western states President Biden did not invite to participate in the meeting. The Biden administration invited eight governors, six Democrats and two Republicans.

 

In response, Governors Little and Gianforte sent Biden a letter today urging him to commit to an “active, responsive” partnership with states in wildfire response, preparedness, and active land management to reduce fire risk. The Governors pointed to their states’ investment in active land management initiatives such as the Good Neighbor Authority and Shared Stewardship.

 

“No state in what it faces and how it responds is like another,” the Governors wrote. “We were disappointed to learn not all western states who face a harsh wildfire season will be at the table.”

 

Stressing the importance of a close, coordinated approach to wildfire response among all levels of government, the governors wrote, “We can achieve the best outcomes for the people we serve when the federal government works with states to develop and execute proactive plans that ensure we promptly respond to fires that put communities at risk. We should apply this operating principle regardless of whether a fire starts on private, state, or federal land.”

 

The governors reiterated their commitment to an aggressive initial response to wildfires and expressed hope the president will join them in that commitment.

 

Addressing the need for active forest management, the Governors said, “it is critical we have a federal partner in the White House who is willing to do what needs to be done year-round to reduce the risk of catastrophic wildfires. The federal government must work with states to actively and meaningfully manage our lands to reduce the risk of catastrophic wildfires.”

 

Governors Little and Gianforte concluded the message to President Biden, writing, “We urge you to commit that our federal partners, regardless of whether they are based in our communities or based in an agency in Washington, D.C., will be active, responsive partners to improve wildfire response, wildfire preparedness, and meaningful forest management.”

 

The full text of the letter may be found below.

 

June 30, 2021

 

The Honorable Joseph R. Biden, Jr.

President of the United States

The White House

1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW

Washington, D.C. 20500

 

Dear President Biden:

 

As our nation’s western states confront an already severe wildfire season, each western governor faces challenges unique to his or her state and brings to bear unique experiences. No state in what it faces and how it responds is like another.

 

While we are encouraged to learn you will meet with eight western governors to discuss the federal government’s response to wildfires, we were disappointed to learn not all western states who face a harsh wildfire season will be at the table.

 

It is critical to engage governors fully and directly to have a productive discussion about how the federal government can improve its wildfire response and prevention efforts.

 

While our states were not invited to participate in your meeting today, our states possess extensive experience and expertise in fighting wildfires, preventing them, and managing our forests. State agencies, working in partnership with the federal government, are on the cutting edge of wildfire response strategies and creative, collaborative forest management practices. Careful investment in and successful implementation of initiatives of the Good Neighbor Authority and Shared Stewardship are two examples.

 

Federal agencies frequently benefit from working closely with state agencies at the local level, and we need the same teamwork to happen at the national level.

 

We can achieve the best outcomes for the people we serve when the federal government works with states to develop and execute proactive plans that ensure we promptly respond to fires that put communities at risk. We should apply this operating principle regardless of whether a fire starts on private, state, or federal land.

 

As the summer continues, our states will work diligently to extinguish wildfires as quickly and prudently as possible to prevent the loss of life and property while continuing to address the land management practices that set the stage for the health of our landscape. We will continue to work toward effective, active land management, and we hope you will join us.

 

While western states will spend the coming months fighting wildfires alongside federal partners on the ground, it is critical we have a federal partner in the White House who is willing to do what needs to be done year-round to reduce the risk of catastrophic wildfires. The federal government must work with states to actively and meaningfully manage our lands to reduce the risk of catastrophic wildfires.

 

The benefits of active land management are clear: healthier forests, communities and lands safer from the risk of severe wildfires, improved wildlife habitat, more recreational opportunities, and more good-paying jobs.

 

Please know our states stand ready to help other states and the federal government as we confront wildfire season.

 

We urge you to commit that our federal partners, regardless of whether they are based in our communities or based in an agency in Washington, D.C., will be active, responsive partners to improve wildfire response, wildfire preparedness, and meaningful forest management.

 

What Are the Signature Drinks From Every State?